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The Peyote Cult, Score Nam Pey

By: Paul Radin

Description: Peyote has never been a drug for thrill seekers. The small, hard cactus is difficult to obtain. It tastes vile, ingestion normally leads to painful vomiting, and the effects are more subtle than other psychedelics. The Native American Peyot

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A Saboba Origin-myth, Score CA Som

By: Geo. W. James

Description: This is a short article on the origin myth of the native Californians of the Tehachapi mountain region, written over a hundred years ago. This area traditionally marks the bounday between northern and southern California. Although this articl

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Mission Memories, Score CA Mm

By: J. S. McGroarty

Description: The author of this book, John Steven McGroarty (1862-1944) was poet laureate of California, an author, journalist, dramatist, and unabashed booster for the preservation and celebration of the California Missions. He also served in Congress fr

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Myths and Legends of the Sioux, Score Nam Sioux

By: Marie L. McLaughlin

Description: This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the

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Maidu Texts, Score CA Mdut

By: Roland B. Dixon

Description: The Maidu lived in the central Sierra Nevada of California, to the north of Yosemite. The Maidu, who were not particularly numerous to begin with, were decimated by the incursion of Americans. These texts were collected by a linguist at the b

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Noqoìlpi, the Gambler, a Navajo Myth

By: Washington Matthews

Description: In the cañon of the Chaco, in northern New Mexico, there are many ruins of ancient pueblos which are still in a fair state of preservation, in some of them entire apartments being yet, it is said, intact. One of the largest of these is called by the Navajos Kintyèl or Kintyèli, which signifies Broad-house. It figures frequently in their legends and is the scene of a very interesting rite-myth, which I have in my collection. I have reason to believe that this...

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Ethnography of the Cahuilla Indians, Score CA Eci

By: A. L. Kroeber

Description: This is a short ethnography of the Cahuilla, who inhabited the desert of Southern California. This mostly covers material culture. However, Kroeber also includes some notes on place names, which solves the debate about where the city names Cu

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Tales and Traditions of the Eskimo

By: Henry Rink

Description: As regards their development when they first became known to modern Europeans, the Eskimo may be classed with the prehistoric races of the age of the ground stone tools with the exceptional use of metals. It has been usual to designate all nations of this kind as savages; some authors have even described them as being totally destitute of those mental qualities through which any kind of culture is manifested, such as social order, laws, sciences, arts, and e...

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The Eskimo of Siberia

By: Waldemar Bogoras

Description: FOLK-TALES. 1. The Dead Bride. There lived a man in the land of Ku’ne, right opposite the island Ima’lik (one of the Diomede Islands). One day he was going to perform the thanksgiving ceremonial, because he was a good sea-hunter, had killed many whales, and fed all his neighbors. So he prepared everything in his house. He placed the tips of whale-flippers upon a skin. Then all at once a thong-seal jumped out of the water-hole upon the ice. The village stood ...

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Yucatan Before and After the Conquest

By: Diego De Landa

Description: Among the many 'bad guys' in the history of sacred texts, the Friar Diego de Landa has to occupy a special circle in hell. In 1562, de Landa conducted an 'Auto de fé' in Maní where in addition to 5000 'idols,' he burned 27 books in Maya writing. This one act deprived future generations of a huge body of Mayan literature. He culturally impoverished the descendents of the Mayas, and left only four codices for scholars to puzzle over. The document translated ...

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The Book of Chilam Balam of Chumayel, Score Nam Cbc

By: Ralph L. Roys

Description: The Mayan Chilam Balam books are named after Yucatec towns such as Chumayel, Mani, and Tizimin, and are usually collections of disparate texts in which Mayan and Spanish traditions have coalesced. The Yucatec Mayas ascribed these to a legenda

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The Algonquin Legends of New England

By: Charles G. Leland

Description: Algonquin Legends of New England

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American Indian Fairy Tales, Score Nam Ait

By: Margaret Compton

Description: This is a collection of Native American folklore, retold for children and young adults, over a century ago. The author, probably not a Native American herself, drew on authentic lore from a wide variety of culture regions, but sprinkled in st

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Tales of the North American Indians

By: Stith Thompson

Description: During the past century the untiring labors of a score or two of field workers have gathered from the North American Indians by far the most extensive body of tales representative of any primitive people. These tales are available in government reports, folk-lore journals, and publications of learned societies. Unfortunately, the libraries in which more than a small portion of them can be examined are few, and even in the largest libraries the very wealth of...

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When the Storm God Rides, Tejas and Other Indian Legends, Score Na...

By: Florence Stratton

Description: This is a collection of Native American lore from Texas. It is focused on the Tejas, a Caddoan group which called itself the Hasinai. The term 'Tejas' is from a Caddoan word which means 'friend,' and it gave us the name of Texas. The Tejas li

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Iroquoian Cosmology, Score Nam Irc

By: J. N. B. Hewitt

Description: This is a set of literal translations of three Iroquois creation myths, from the Onondaga, Seneca and Mohawk tribes respectively. The interlinear translations in the original have been omitted for technical reasons. These myths are of great i

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The Traditions of the Hopi, Score Nam Toth

By: H. R. Voth

Description: This book of Hopi folklore, collected by an ethnographer early in the 20th century, is one of the most extensive available. It is now known that the Hopi were a bit selective in what they told the earliest researchers, but this does not lesse

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Rig Veda Americanus

By: Daniel G. Brinton

Description: In accordance with the general object of this series of volumes--which is to furnish materials for study rather than to offer completed studies--I have prepared for this number the text of the most ancient authentic record of American religious lore. From its antiquity and character, I have ventured to call this little collection the RIG VEDA AMERICANUS, after the similar cyclus of sacred hymns, which are the most venerable product of the Aryan mind. As fo...

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Pueblo Indian Folk-stories, Score Nam Pifs

By: Charles Lummis

Description: This is a collection of stories from the Isleta Pueblo people of New Mexico. Charles Lummis [1859-1928] was a pioneering writer, photographer, amateur anthropologist and adventurer who, according to himself, invented the term 'The Southwest'.

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Chinook Texts, Score Nam Chinook

By: Franz Boas

Description:The Chinook tribes inhabited the salmon-rich lower Columbia river area in the Northwest culture region, in what is now upper Oregon and lower Washington state. As is evident from these texts, fishing was at the center of their culture, and the

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